Posts tagged Hot off the press
Hot Off the Press - If You're Charged with a Crime
If You're Charged wih a Crime cover

We updated this easy-to-understand brochure with revised content, including a section highlighting our new Aboriginal publications.

If You’re Charged with a Crime outlines:

  • what happens when someone is charged with a criminal offence,

  • the first steps in the court process and the options available,

  • the accused person’s legal rights, and

  • how to get legal aid or other legal help.

Previous editions of this brochure are no longer current; please recycle.

Hot Off the Press: If You Can’t Get Legal Aid for Your Child Protection Case

If You Can’t Get Legal Aid for Your Child Protection Case is now back in stock, and you can order it from Crown Publications.

This booklet is for people facing a complicated child protection hearing who’ve been denied legal aid and can’t afford a lawyer.

It explains why you can ask for a court-appointed lawyer and how to apply. It includes the forms you need, what you should say to the judge in court, and where to get legal help and other support.

Updates to this new edition include:

  • a glossary with frequently used words and phrases,
  • restructured content for a more logical, step-by-step approach,
  • redefined terminology,
  • improved forms instructions,
  • more cross-references to forms, and
  • graphics to improve accessibility.

Previous editions are no longer current; please recycle.

Hot Off the Press: Sponsorship Breakdown

The new English version of Sponsorship Breakdown is now available in Punjabi, Spanish, simplified and traditional Chinese, and (online only) French.

Sponsorship Breakdown was revised in the fall of 2017 to reflect changes to immigration law — most importantly, the elimination of conditional permanent resident status. This booklet is for permanent residents who need help when their sponsor stops supporting them.

Hot Off the Press: If You Can’t Get Legal Aid for Your Criminal Trial
If You Can’t Get Legal Aid for Your Criminal Trial

We’ve revised and reprinted If You Can’t Get Legal Aid for Your Criminal Trial. This booklet is for people facing serious and complex criminal charges who’ve been denied legal aid and can’t afford a lawyer.

It explains why, how, and when to make a Rowbotham application – to ask the judge to stay your charges until the government provides funding for a lawyer. It also explains:

  • what you have to prove,
  • how to prepare for court, and
  • what happens in court.

The revisions we’ve made to the booklet include:

  • Clarifying terminology
  • Restructuring the information to present the application process more logically and in clearly defined steps
  • Adding visuals to improve readability

The booklet includes a checklist of points to cover in court and copies of the necessary court forms, with instructions on how to complete them.

Note that the French version of this publication does not include the recent changes that are in the English version.

Hot Off the Press: Gladue Report Guide
Gladue Report Guide

Aboriginal peoples have Gladue rights under the Criminal Code of Canada, as a result of their unique circumstances in Canada. This means when an Aboriginal person is before the court for a bail hearing or sentencing, the judge must apply Gladue principles and take into account the background factors that may have brought them there. The Aboriginal person can give the court information about themselves and their family history in a Gladue report to help the judge decide the best restorative justice option for them and their community.

Our plain language booklet Gladue Report Guide is a new publication to help Gladue report writers. The booklet explains the tasks involved and information required to prepare and write an effective Gladue report to help the Aboriginal person before the court receive fair treatment.

The Gladue Report Guide is one of five new LSS Aboriginal publications about Gladue rights and First Nations Court. The others are Your Gladue Rights, Gladue Rights at Bail and Sentencing, Gladue Submission Guide, and What’s First Nations Court?

To find out more about Gladue rights, see the Aboriginal Legal Aid in BC website.

Hot off the Press: A Guide to Aboriginal Harvesting Rights
Harvesting Rights

We’ve produced a new and expanded edition of our booklet A Guide to Aboriginal Harvesting Rights. This guide is for Aboriginal people who want to understand their harvesting rights — the right to fish, hunt, and trap, and gather plants, fungi, and timber. The booklet explains in plain language:

  • Aboriginal rights protected under the Constitution, and how they translate to harvesting rights in BC,
  • Métis harvesting rights, including how to get a Métis harvester card,
  • treaty rights,
  • tips for harvesting outside your traditional territory,
  • what to do if you’ve been charged with hunting or fishing illegally,
  • how to get legal help, and
  • the court process.

What’s new in this edition?

  • A checklist of things to confirm before you go harvesting and what to bring with you
  • More examples of what’s considered a harvesting offence, how to reduce your chances of being charged, and when it’s a good idea to get a licence or permit
  • Harvesting restrictions based on conservation, public health, and public safety reasons
  • Whether you can trade, barter, or sell harvest
  • What to do if you want to fish outside your Nation’s communal licence

A Guide to Aboriginal Harvesting Rights is available online and in print. The previous edition of this booklet is no longer current; please recycle.

Hot off the Press: Five translations of Is That Legal? What the Law Says about Online Harassment and Abuse
Is That Legal - Arabic

In 2017 in collaboration with West Coast Legal Education and Action Fund (West Coast LEAF), we published the second English edition of Is That Legal? to help youth be safer online when they use social media. Now this popular booklet is also available in Arabic, simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, Punjabi, and Spanish.

Is That Legal? describes four online situations youth might find themselves in:

  • taking intimate images
  • sharing intimate images
  • cyberstalking
  • sexual exploitation

The brightly coloured booklet explains in plain language what the law says about each situation, including:

  • what consent means and the age of consent in Canada;
  • what an intimate image is;
  • when an action is sexual assault, criminal harassment, uttering threats and intimidation, extortion, or child pornography; and
  • what Internet luring and grooming is.

It also says what you or someone you know can do in these situations, and where to get support services and legal help.

Is That Legal? is available online and in print in the six languages.

Hot Off the Press – Four Criminal Law Publications

We’ve updated four of our criminal law booklets: Representing Yourself in a Criminal TrialDefending Yourself: Breach of a Court OrderDefending Yourself: Theft Under $5,000; and Speaking to the Judge Before You’re Sentenced.

We’ve revised design and content in each, including three attractive new covers. All of these plain language booklets help an accused person represent themselves in a criminal matter. Available in print and online.

Hot Off the Press – Working with Your Legal Aid Lawyer

We’ve translated Working with Your Legal Aid Lawyer fact sheet into Arabic, simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, Punjabi, and Spanish.

This fact sheet outlines the roles and responsibilities of the client and the legal aid lawyer in a balanced way, so they both know what to expect from a legal aid contract. It also explains:

  • what the lawyer’s time on the case includes,
  • what the lawyer can’t do,
  • change of lawyer requests, and
  • where to find out about making a complaint.

Knowing each other’s roles and responsibilities helps clients and lawyers work together on the case.

Hot off the Press – Parents’ Rights, Kids’ Rights

We revised and redesigned this popular booklet and it’s now back in print. Parents Rights, Kids Rights explains what happens if the Director of Child Welfare has concerns about a child’s safety or plans to remove a child from the family home. The booklet describes the child protection process for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children and families, including:

  • collaborative (shared) planning and decision-making options to stay out of court,
  • what can be decided in court at the presentation and protection hearings,
  • community services and legal help, and
  • definitions of terms.

We made the following revisions to this edition:

  • integrated information about the child protection process for Aboriginal children and families throughout the booklet (previous editions had a separate chapter on the Aboriginal child protection process);
  • designed one flow chart that provides an overview of the child protection process for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children and families (the stand-alone pieces The Aboriginal Child Protection Process and The Child Protection Process are also available); and
  • used friendly, original drawings on the cover and to introduce each section of the booklet.

Parents Rights, Kids Rights is available in print and online. Please recycle previous editions.

Hot Off the Press: Five new translations of Live Safe, End Abuse

Our fact sheets on abuse and family violence have been thoroughly redesigned and updated. They’re now combined into a convenient single booklet, available in print and online in simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, Farsi, Punjabi, and Spanish. Live Safe, End Abuse is for people leaving an abusive partner. The booklet contains information on what abuse is, how people can plan for their safety and protect their children, and who can help. Topics include:

  • safety planning
  • women abused by their partners
  • keeping your children safe
  • men abused by their partners
  • protection orders
  • getting help from the police or RCMP
  • who can help?
  • if your sponsor abuses you
  • what to do about money
  • the criminal court process

This booklet replaces the Live Safe – End Abuse fact sheet series.

Hot Off the Press - The Child Protection Process (flow chart)
childSupport_hands.png

We’ve revised this poster that describes the child protection process in flow chart form. The step-by-step overview:

  • begins at the investigation and the decision whether protection is required,
  • shows the outcomes of the presentation hearing, and
  • ends with the possible outcomes of the protection hearing.

The revised poster now includes options for what to do if a child is under a continuing custody order.

The revised poster is available online only.

The previous printed edition is legally accurate, but doesn’t include the information about continuing custody orders.

Hot Off the Press - Sponsorship Breakdown

Back in stock! We’ve revised Sponsorship Breakdown to reflect changes to immigration law — most importantly, the elimination of conditional permanent resident status. We’ve also updated the chapter about applying for welfare and the section listing community groups and other help. Sponsorship Breakdown is for permanent residents who need money and other help when the person sponsoring them in Canada stops supporting them.

Hot off the Press - Your Gladue Rights

We just reprinted the plain language booklet Your Gladue Rights with minor revisions. If you have copies of the March 2017 edition, please recycle them because they’re no longer legally accurate. People who identify as Aboriginal have Gladue rights under the Criminal Code as a result of their circumstances (experiences) in Canada. The word Gladue comes from a Supreme Court of Canada case about an Aboriginal woman named Jamie Gladue. In her case, the judge said that the criminal justice system failed Aboriginal people and too many Aboriginal people were being sent to jail. As a result, judges must consider an Aboriginal person’s background as well as the history of Aboriginal people in Canada when Aboriginal people are in court for bail, sentencing, or appeals.

Your Gladue Rights explains:

  • Gladue and how it’s applied in court,
  • restorative justice,
  • the history of Gladue, and
  • the difference between written Gladue reports and oral Gladue submissions.

For more information about Aboriginal legal rights, see our Aboriginal Legal Aid in BC website.

Hot Off the Press – One new and two revised French translation
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LSS is committed to providing PLEI publications in our second language for our francophone community here in BC and for all French-speaking newcomers to BC. We’ve just released three new or revised French translations, available online only.

The new French translation:

Mères quittant un partenaire violent : Renseignements concernant le droit de la familleMothers LeavingAbusive Partners: Family Law Information

This booklet is a plain language guide for women who’ve been abused by their intimate partner (such as a spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend). Topics include:

  • what is abuse
  • how to protect yourself and your children
  • what the courts can do
  • what will happen to the children
  • deciding parenting arrangements
  • where to get help and support
  • what to take with you when you leave

The revised French translations:

Vivez en sécurité, Mettez fin à la violence — Live Safe, End Abuse

Our fact sheets on abuse and family violence have been thoroughly revised and updated and combined into a single booket. This booklet is for people leaving an abusive partner. It contains information on what abuse is, how people can plan for their safety and protect their children, and who can help. Topics include:

  • safety planning
  • women abused by their partners
  • keeping your children safe
  • men abused by their partners
  • protection orders
  • getting help from the police or RCMP
  • who can help
  • if your sponsor abuses you
  • what to do about money
  • the criminal court process

Vivre ensemble ou séparémentLiving Together or Living Apart

We’ve revised and updated our popular, award-winning booklet. Previous versions are no longer accurate and should be discarded.

Family law can be complicated. But with the right information and help, you can solve many issues on your own without going to court. This booklet explains your legal options and where to get help. It also includes a chapter for immigrant families. Topics include:

  • your rights and responsibilities if you’re married or in a marriage-like relationship
  • how spouses can work out agreements
  • what to do if you decide to separate or divorce
  • how to work out arrangements for parenting if you have children
  • how to sort out money matters

All these translations are available, online-only, on the MyLawBC website. You can also find a full list of all our French PLEI publications.

Thank you to the Francophone Affairs Program in BC for funding these translations, made possible through the Canada–British Columbia Official Languages Agreement on French-Language Services.

Hot off the Press - Applying for Welfare Online
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We’ve published a new fact sheet about how to apply for welfare online, using your computer or mobile phone. It gives a plain language overview of the three stages involved:

  1. Register
  2. Apply
  3. Follow-up — What happens next

It explains the steps you follow at each stage:

  • Create a My Self Serve (MySS) account and Basic BCeID
  • Log in to your account and create a service request
  • Complete and submit your application
  • Upload documents the ministry needs
  • Check on your application status

The fact sheet expands on the information printed in the booklet How to Apply for Welfare, which also describes how you can apply by phone or at ministry offices. The fact sheet and booklet are both part of the series Your Welfare Rights.

Applying for Welfare Online is available in print and online.

Hot off the Press – Legal Aid Can Help You

We’ve reprinted the English version of our Legal Aid Can Help You brochure with minor revisions. This plain language brochure is also available in print and online in Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Kurdish, Punjabi, and Spanish, and online only in French. These language versions don't include the most recent changes and updates that appear in the English version. Previous versions should be recycled.

The brochure outlines legal aid services and what kind of help is available by phone, in person, and online. It also lists all legal aid locations in BC with the phone numbers.