Posts tagged Gladue
Gladue Reports Graphic Novel Focus Group

The Legal Services Society (Legal Aid BC) is working with the Healthy Aboriginal Network to create a story about Gladue reports in the form of a graphic novel and video.

Under the Criminal Code, people who identify as Aboriginal have Gladue rights. These rights encourage judges to take a restorative justice approach to sentencing that helps both the offender and community heal. The Supreme Court of Canada has confirmed that judges must look at how Indigenous offenders’ lives have been affected by colonialism and systemic racism and must consider sentences other than jail to repair the harm a crime has done.

You're invited to watch the focus group short and provide feedback. The videos are made from the rough storyboards, so that after focus group testing and feedback, the story and illustrations can be edited easily and cheaply. After you watch the video, please think about what you liked the most/least and if the story, situation, and characters seemed realistic to you.

Please email your feedback to sean@thehealthyaboriginal.net.

AboriginalLegal Aidvideo, Gladue, comic
Increased funding for Gladue reports

This year, the Legal Services Society has increased funding available for Gladue reports.

Under the criminal code, people who identify as Aboriginal have Gladue rights. These rights encourage judges to take a restorative justice approach to sentencing that helps both the offender and community heal. The Supreme Court of Canada has confirmed that judges must look at how Indigenous offenders’ lives have been affected by colonialism and systemic racism and must consider sentences other than jail to repair the harm a crime has done.

A Gladue report helps the judge take into account Gladue rights during sentencing or when setting bail. Legal aid lawyers can request funding for the production of these reports. For more information about legal aid Gladue reports, please contact us at gladue.coordinator@lss.bc.ca.

You can learn more about Gladue rights and Gladue reports on the Aboriginal Legal Aid in BC website and from our Gladue publications (scroll down to see them all).

Hot off the Press - Your Gladue Rights

We just reprinted the plain language booklet Your Gladue Rights with minor revisions. If you have copies of the March 2017 edition, please recycle them because they’re no longer legally accurate. People who identify as Aboriginal have Gladue rights under the Criminal Code as a result of their circumstances (experiences) in Canada. The word Gladue comes from a Supreme Court of Canada case about an Aboriginal woman named Jamie Gladue. In her case, the judge said that the criminal justice system failed Aboriginal people and too many Aboriginal people were being sent to jail. As a result, judges must consider an Aboriginal person’s background as well as the history of Aboriginal people in Canada when Aboriginal people are in court for bail, sentencing, or appeals.

Your Gladue Rights explains:

  • Gladue and how it’s applied in court,
  • restorative justice,
  • the history of Gladue, and
  • the difference between written Gladue reports and oral Gladue submissions.

For more information about Aboriginal legal rights, see our Aboriginal Legal Aid in BC website.

Hot off the Press – Gladue Submission Guide
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People who identify as Aboriginal have Gladue rights under the Criminal Code of Canada as a result of their unique circumstances in Canada. This means that when an Aboriginal person is being sentenced, the judge must apply Gladue principles and take into account the factors that may have brought that person before the court. The Aboriginal person can give the court information about themselves and their family history in a Gladue submission to help the judge decide the best sentence for them and their community. Our plain language booklet, Gladue Submission Guide, is a new resource to help Aboriginal peoples, lawyers, Native courtworkers, and advocates to prepare a Gladue submission for court.

The booklet explains Gladue rights, what happens at a bail or sentencing hearing, and what’s in a Gladue submission. It includes a Gladue factors checklist and a worksheet to gather the information needed to prepare a submission. In the worksheet, the Aboriginal person can give details about the Gladue factors that shaped their life and the restorative justice options that may help them address the issues that brought them before the court.

The Gladue Submission Guide is one of four new LSS Aboriginal publications about Gladue rights and First Nations Court this year. The other three are Your Gladue Rights, Gladue Rights at Bail and Sentencing, and What’s First Nations Court?

To find out more about Gladue rights, see the Aboriginal website.

Hot Off the Press: New Aboriginal publications about Gladue rights and First Nations Court

We’ve just released three new Aboriginal publications about Gladue rights and First Nations Court in print and online, and two more will be coming later this year. People who identify as Aboriginal have Gladue rights under the Criminal Code as a result of their circumstances (experiences) in Canada. The word Gladue comes from a Supreme Court of Canada case about an Aboriginal woman named Jamie Gladue. In her case, the judge said that the criminal justice system failed Aboriginal people and too many Aboriginal people were being sent to jail. As a result, judges must consider an Aboriginal person’s background as well as the history of Aboriginal people in Canada when Aboriginal people are in court for bail, sentencing, or appeals.

To learn more about Gladue rights and First Nations Court, check out these new publications!

Your Gladue Rights

Aboriginal peoples have rights under the Criminal Code of Canada called Gladue rights. This brief, plain language booklet explains:

  • Gladue and how it’s applied in court,
  • restorative justice,
  • the history of Gladue, and
  • the difference between written Gladue reports and oral Gladue submissions.

What’s First Nations Court?

This fact sheet for Aboriginal peoples explains restorative justice at First Nations Court, how to get into First Nations Court, where they’re located, and what a healing plan is.

Gladue Rights at Bail and Sentencing

This infographic poster shows when Gladue is applied at bail and sentencing hearings, and when to get a Gladue report or prepare a Gladue submission.

Coming soon:

Gladue Submission Guide

Gladue Report Guide